Intersectoral effects   

I. The relationship between health and income

This project provides a review of the economic literature on estimates of the effects of health on income as conceptualized in a production function. Health may enter the production function by influencing the quality or quantity of labour supply, capital investment decisions or total factor productivity.  Studies are included for their relevance to the UK and their ability to address causal relationships from health to income and exclude the effect of income on health or the impact of confounding factors.

Project team: David Epstein, Karl Claxton, Mark Sculpher, Nigel Rice.

Contact: Karl Claxton. Click here to email Karl.  

Outputs:

Epstein D, Claxton K, Sculpher M, Rice N. Estimates of the relationship between health and income - a literature review. EEPRU research report.

II.  NICE's cost effectiveness threshold adjusted for wider social benefits (value based pricing)

This project aimed to evaluate the feasibility of using evidence from the most up to date estimate of the NICE cost effectiveness threshold to adjust it to consider the implications of incorporating wider social benefits in cost effectiveness analysis under the proposals for value based pricing. The most up to date estimate of the unadjusted threshold is reported in a separate project (funded by the MRC and finalised by York and collaborators in 2013, see http://www.york.ac.uk/che/research/teehta/methodological-research/#tab-4). Under this project, unpublished evidence was collated and further transformed (where appropriate) to provide the DH with inputs for calculation of the policy relevant threshold under value based pricing.

Contact: Marta Soares. Click here to email Marta. 

 

III. Economic evaluation when costs and effects cross sectors

 The aim of this project is to consider appropriate methods to evaluate interventions whose costs and (dis)benefits extend beyond the NHS across multiple sectors of the economy (e.g. into education, criminal justice and the wider economy). Alternative approaches include, for example, a multi sector approach where the cost-effectiveness of interventions is assessed from the viewpoint of different government sectors and the use of broader outcome measures which are relevant across multiple sectors.

 

Conference presentations

Walker S, Griffin S, Claxton K, Palmer S, and Sculpher M. Appropriate methods for economic evaluation of programmes with costs and effects extending across sectors? Health Economics Study Group Oxford, June 2012.

Walker S, Griffin S, Claxton K, Palmer S, and Sculpher M. Perspectives, Intersectoral Effects and Compensation Tests. Health Technology Assessment International, Bilbao Spain, July 2012.

Walker S, Griffin S, Claxton K, Palmer S, and Sculpher M. Appropriate methods for economic evaluation of programmes with costs and effects extending across sectors. ISPOR, Berlin, November 2012.

 Project teamSimon Walker, Susan Griffin, Karl Claxton, Mark Sculpher

Contact: Simon Walker. Click here to email Simon.